Ashmolean Internships Winner

Skip to Navigation

Skip to Search

Internships have been awarded to:

2012

Jennifer Aston (University of Birmingham)

Jennifer has completed a three-month internship, funded by the Economic History Society, at the Winton Institute for Monetary History, Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford. This involved extracting data on leasehold prices, landlords and tenants from the leasehold books of the Calthorpe Estate in Birmingham and entering it into a database. This data forms part of the 'Property Rents and Prices in Urban England’ project with Professor Nicholas Mayhew and Dr Catherine Casson which will eventually link the evidence from nineteenth-century Birmingham with medieval and early modern Gloucester and Oxford.

Aaron Jaffer (University of Warwick)

Aaron completed a three-month internship funded by the Economic History Society at the Winton Institute for Monetary History, Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford. This involved working with shipping records held at the British Library relating to mutiny and shipwreck in the Indian Ocean. The research sheds light on the relationship between insurers, private traders and the East India Company in the early nineteenth century. 

Deborah Thorpe (University of York)

Deborah worked on the Property Rents and Prices in Urban England project, alongside Professor Nick Mayhew and Dr Catherine Casson at the Winton Institute for Monetary History at the Ashmolean Museum. She examined and transcribed documents associated with Balliol College, University of Oxford, to extract information about the rental of property by the College from the 1400s up until the 1800s. It is hoped that this information will contribute to a wider study of urban rents, by the Winton Institute, over the years to come.


2011

Tim Crafter (University of Oxford)

Alice Dolan (University of Hertfordshire)

Alice completed a three-month internship, funded by the Economic History Society, at the Winton Institute for Monetary History, Ashmolean Museum, University of Oxford. Her project ‘prying in pockets’ used the Old Bailey Proceedings to investigate everyday interactions between men and their money c.1730-1810. The research revealed that clothing had a significant and changing impact on the safety of valuables. Lines of enquiry included the contents of pockets, the impact of new fashions, the division of money and the ‘safest’ pocket. She intends to publish this research.

Lucy Moore (University of Oxford)

Add This Social Media Links