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WOMEN’S WORK IN THE VICTORIAN ERA: New census evidence undermines view that ‘a woman’s place was in the home’

Date:
27 Mar 2014

Summary:

The idea of the Victorian woman as the ‘angel of the home’, who gave up work at marriage and devoted her life to raising her family and keeping house, is simply not accurate. Indeed, according to new research by Dr Amanda Wilkinson, to be presented at the Economic History Society’s 2014 annual conference, a significant proportion of working-class women were working after they married and continued to do so throughout their lives. And many were their families’ breadwinner.

THE UK’S FIRST SOVEREIGN CREDIT RATING: New evidence on how the government secured ‘triple-A’ status in the late 1970s

Date:
27 Mar 2014

Summary:

Only 18 months after the UK government was bailed out by the International Monetary Fund, it managed to secure ‘triple-A’ status when Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s provided the country’s first sovereign credit rating in 1978. In a study to be presented at the Economic History Society’s 2014 annual conference, David James Gill details the successful efforts of senior officials at the Bank of England and the Treasury to influence the ratings process.

THE BLACK DEATH BOOSTED WAGES FOR MEN AND MARRIED WOMEN

Date:
27 Mar 2014

Summary:

The late middle ages were happy days in England. The Black Death hit the country in the mid-fourteenth century and killed off half the work force. But demographic catastrophe had a silver lining! The survivors enjoyed a huge pay rise. It was a ‘golden age’ for the English peasantry. Before the Black Death, a man could barely support his wife; after the plague, he easily sustained a family of six.

BRAND-BUILDING AT THE BANK OF ENGLAND: The value of Britannia as the symbol of an emerging institution

Date:
27 Mar 2014

Summary:

From its earliest days in the late seventeenth century, the Bank of England quite consciously used the symbol of Britannia as a powerful brand to build its reputation and its connections to the British economy and state. That is the central finding of a new study by Jennifer Basford and Anne Murphy, to be presented at the Economic History Society’s 2014 annual conference.

GETTING BACK TO GROWTH: HISTORY LESSONS FROM THE 1930s

Date:
26 Jun 2013

Summary:

How Britain escaped from the travails of the Great Depression and achieved 4% a year growth in the years from 1933 to 1937 has important lessons for today’s policy-makers, according to research by Professor Nicholas Crafts, presented at the Economic History Society’s 2013 annual conference.

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