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BRITISH MANUFACTURING IN THE INTERWAR YEARS: A technological success story

Date:
27 Mar 2014

Summary:

Unprecedented technological advances made in Britain during the depression years of the 1920s and 1930s provided the basis for much of the productivity growth of British industry during the ‘Golden Age’, the quarter century between 1948 and 1973. That is one of the findings of research by Dr Pieter Woltjer, to be presented at the Economic History Society’s 2014 annual conference.

THE IMPACT OF WORLD WAR TWO ON THE INDUSTRIALISATION OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH

Date:
27 Mar 2014

Summary:

World War Two provided demand and capital to the economy of the American South, which may have promoted the region’s industrialisation. But according to research by Taylor Jaworski, to be presented at the Economic History Society’s 2014 annual conference, war spending can explain only a small portion of the South’s aggregate post-war manufacturing growth and its convergence with northern industrial structures between 1940 and 1980.

CHILD LABOUR IN THE INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION: New evidence of pauper apprenticeship in Victorian England

Date:
27 Mar 2014

Summary:

The Victorian era system of ‘batch apprenticeships’, in which children aged 9-14 were sent great distances to work in mills survived much deeper into the nineteenth century than previously thought. That is the finding of research by Caroline Withall, to be presented at the Economic History Society’s 2014 annual conference. Her study reveals how deeply entrenched the system was and how long it survived even after regulations seeking to end it.

FISCAL CHALLENGES FOR THE MEDIEVAL ENGLISH STATE: Lessons for today from the Wars of the Roses

Date:
27 Mar 2014

Summary:

The fifteenth-century English government of Henry VI was unable to negotiate a fiscal policy capable of tapping into growing sectors of the economy to finance war and reduce budgetary problems. In a study to be presented at the Economic History Society’s 2014 annual conference, Alex Brayson draws parallels with the risk that contemporary British governments that attempt to resolve budgetary problems solely through reducing expenditure on public services and jobs will struggle to foster an improvement in the lives of the majority of British people.

AFRICA’S RECENT ECONOMIC SUCCESS IN A EUROPEAN MIRROR: A historical perspective on avoiding ‘growth reversals’ and achieving sustained growth

Date:
27 Mar 2014

Summary:

Europe’s pre-industrial economies provide valuable insights into whether Africa’s recent economic success can be turned into sustained growth. According to research by Professors Stephen Broadberry and Leigh Gardner, to be presented at the Economic History Society’s 2014 annual conference, the European experience suggests that the more important criteria are indicators of institutional quality and structural change.

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